In the new year, I’ve been working my way through a stack of discarded/ignored paintings—quick class demos that never found a way or bright ideas that got lost in material layers.  It’s a history of experiments—plaster, wood, sand, cardboard, paper—acrylic, oil paint, pigment sticks, charcoal, artgraf, house paint.

Most of this work involves editing—what to keep, what to lose—a left/right brain exercise of deliberation and risk. It’s an adventuresome process with the work itself providing the guidelines. Spontaneity is inherent—new directions prompted by old decisions.

Abstract painter Thomas Noskowski used revision as a basic tool, reworking pieces over time, scraping to reveal, painting over to conceal. I find that I, too, love the “yes” and “no” of letting a piece speak, of paying close attention as the surface ultimately reveals its own direction.

To see more reinventions, go to the SMALL WORKS section of the website. I'll continue posting as there are more to see.
All are for sale. If you're interested, please email me for info. 

Goat Rodeo

04/09/2021

Zoom portfolio reviews--worth it?
Painter and painting--who's really in charge?
Art with a message--experiments with a word challenge.
Revise, renew, reinvent...
Walking to the studio, looking around...

12/28/2020

Concerning art and angels
Learning from artist's block
How do paintings come together? Do you end up with what you had in mind when you started?
John Cage informs the process
Making art. Hard enough to do it. Should I write about it? Yes? No? But what about...

Starting From Something

1/30/2021

In the new year, I’ve been working my way through a stack of discarded/ignored paintings—quick class demos that never found a way or bright ideas that got lost in material layers.  It’s a history of experiments—plaster, wood, sand, cardboard, paper—acrylic, oil paint, pigment sticks, charcoal, artgraf, house paint.

Most of this work involves editing—what to keep, what to lose—a left/right brain exercise of deliberation and risk. It’s an adventuresome process with the work itself providing the guidelines. Spontaneity is inherent—new directions prompted by old decisions.

Abstract painter Thomas Noskowski used revision as a basic tool, reworking pieces over time, scraping to reveal, painting over to conceal. I find that I, too, love the “yes” and “no” of letting a piece speak, of paying close attention as the surface ultimately reveals its own direction.

To see more reinventions, go to the SMALL WORKS section of the website. I'll continue posting as there are more to see.
All are for sale. If you're interested, please email me for info.